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The following are a view tips that help highlight some important information regarding frequently asked questions from parents.

Flossing helps teeth and gums

By age 2, daily flossing is preferred. It removes food and plaque from between the teeth. Plaque is the sticky yellow substance that forms on teeth after eating things like bread, raisins, cookies and cake and drinking milk or soda. Bacteria grows on the plaque and forms an acid that leads to tooth decay. It can get past the gums, damage the bone and destroy the root.

To floss your child’s teeth, wrap the floss around your fingers and glide it between the teeth in a C-shaped motion. Be gentle! Forcing the floss between teeth can make the gums bleed, which can scare children into thinking that flossing hurts (it shouldn’t). To prevent bacteria from spreading in the mouth, use a new section of floss each time you move between two teeth.

Teeth grinding

Teeth grinding (or “bruxism”) may sound scary coming from young mouths, but it usually isn’t harmful. Grinding is common in children under age 7 and typically stops when their six-year permanent molars come through.

Pain from an earache or teething, an abnormal bite (the top and bottom teeth don’t meet) or a change in routine – such as a new sibling or school – can cause children to grind their teeth while sleeping. Middle- and high-school-age students may suffer stress-related grinding when they’re facing a major test.

In some cases, a child is angry or unable to verbally express frustration about something. Children who are hyperactive or have certain medical conditions, such as cerebral palsy, may also grind.

Tell us about any grinding or jaw clenching that you or family members have noticed. (People often don’t know that they’re doing this.) Also mention if your child complains of a sore jaw or face in the morning or pain when chewing.

Most children outgrow bruxism, but until they do, parental observation and dental visits are needed to keep the situation in check.

Thumb sucking

Most children outgrow thumb sucking by age 5. If it continues when permanent teeth start coming in, dental or speech problems may occur. Children can develop teeth that stick out or don’t close properly or a lisp. Older children often get teased for thumb sucking, which makes them secretive and ashamed. Stress, anxiety or other emotional issues should be addressed first. Ask your pediatric dentist for advice. Breaking this habit requires patience, love and encouragement from parents and caregivers.

Wiggly teeth

To pull or not to pull loose baby teeth? That’s a question all parents and caregivers face.

Baby teeth should be left alone to fall out naturally. If these teeth are bothersome, encouraging children to do the pulling themselves would be the first option, as they can better control how much discomfort they can tolerate.

Eating apples is an easy and stress-free tool to help the wiggly tooth fall. There are some circumstances when consulting with your pediatric dentist is recommended: If the child is experiencing considerable pain or has special care needs (to avoid risk of aspiration) or has permanent teeth coming out in an undesirable position.

Healthy snacks

If the whole family enjoys healthy snacks, children will want them, too. A healthy snack is low in sugar and high in nutrients – just what young teeth and mouths need. Keep low-fat string cheese and yogurt, milk and cut fruit and veggies on hand. Let children choose healthy options at the store and mix-and-match them with hummus, low-fat dips or whole-grain crackers. Limit the number of snack times and save “fun foods” for special occasions.

Article originally posted to The Center for Pediatric Dentistry.




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Losing your first tooth can be an overwhelming, exciting experience for both parent and child!

Please check out this informational video made by a collection of Minnesota dentists that talks about losing your first tooth and the great importance of taking care of your baby teeth and adult teeth, too!

Check out this video made by Minnesota dentists that talks about losing your first tooth and the importance of taking care of your baby teeth and your adult teeth, too! View below:

Losing Your First Tooth!


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If you think you’re busy, try being a kid. In addition to school, activities and family time, they’re learning how to take care of themselves and others in new ways every single day.

One of those necessary life skills every child needs to learn is brushing his or her teeth. Helping your child get in the habit of brushing twice a day for two minutes is no small feat, but a little creativity can go a long way when it comes to his or her long-term dental health.

Need to brush up on the basics of cleaning your child’s teeth? Here’s how:

Have 4 Minutes of Fun

Don’t just set a timer and supervise – make brushing twice a day for two minutes an event! Crank up your child’s favorite song and have a two-minute dance party. Videos or brushing apps may also make that time fly by. (Younger brushers might like these.) Try reading a 2-minute story using all your best voices. Whatever you do, get creative and switch things up so brushing time is always a good time.

Start a Routine and Stick to It

You may be tempted to let your child skip brushing after a long day or during times when your normal schedule is off (like vacation), but keep at it. The more second nature brushing becomes the easier it will be to make sure your child is brushing twice a day for two minutes.

Reward Good Brushing Behavior

What motivates your child? If its stickers, make a reward chart and let him add one every time he brushes. If he’s a reader, let him pick out the bedtime story. Maybe it’s as simple as asking to see that healthy smile, saying “I’m so proud of you” and following up with a huge high five.

Characters Count

Who is the character your child can’t get enough of? Many children’s shows and books, including Sesame Street, have stories about brushing. Watch and read them together, so when it’s time to brush you can use that character as a good example.

Make Up a Story

Haven’t found a story or character to inspire your child? Make up your own. Your child just might be the only superhero who can brush away the bad guys that cause cavities.

Go Shopping

Let your child pick out his own toothbrush and toothpaste. (We recommend ones with the ADA Seal of Acceptance.) Choosing a character toothbrush might make brushing more fun, and fluoride toothpastes come in a variety of flavors and colors.

Make Brushing a Family Affair

Your children learn from you, so set a good example. The family that brushes together has even more reason to smile.

Original Article by Mouth Healthy.


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The toddling years: a thrilling time for the child and the parent, although in vastly different ways. For toddlers, it’s all about exploration; learning to crawl and walk and being on the move as much as possible. For parents, though, it’s often a fine line between celebrating their child’s accomplishments one minute, and fretting over their safety the next.

As children begin to walk, they become more susceptible to accidents. It’s all part of the process of growing up, of course, but falling or bumping into hard objects can damage their new little teeth. If left untreated, dental injuries that result from these “misadventures” can lead to infection – in both the mouth and other places like the ears, sinuses and brain – loss of teeth and, ultimately, costly dental restorative treatment. That’s why it’s so important to have a plan in place and a Dental Home – or home base – established for your child’s dental needs. Plus, children who have already visited Eversmiles will perceive the dental office as a friendly place, and they might be calmer and less afraid in the event of a dental emergency.

What is a dental emergency – and what should you do?

A dental emergency can be any traumatic injury to the mouth that results in significant bleeding. The first thing we tell parents is that in the event of any dental issue, emergency or not, they can always call us. If there is bleeding, significant pain, swelling or fever – or simply doubt about whether or not their child needs immediate treatment – just pick up the phone.

In today’s smartphone-enabled world, we’ll often ask parents to take a picture of the injury and text it to us. That way, we can determine the extent of the damage and answer any questions they might have prior to their visit.

Common dental injuries

We’ve seen all kinds of dental injuries – but most involve a child chipping his or her teeth or entirely knocking out a tooth. In these situations, there are different protocols to follow depending on whether or not the affected tooth is a baby tooth or a permanent tooth.

For an injury that has resulted in a chipped front tooth – baby or permanent – rinse the child’s mouth with water if there is bleeding and apply a cold compress to the lip to minimize bleeding and reduce swelling. Save any tooth fragments you’re able to find and bring them with you to the pediatric dentist. If the chipped tooth was a permanent front tooth, the broken fragment (which should be kept in water) might be bonded in place for the most ideal cosmetic repair. If the tooth fragment can’t be found, there are many other cosmetic bonding options.

If toddlers displace, or knock out, one or more of their baby four front teeth, the dentist may be able to reposition those teeth to minimize the chances of premature tooth loss. Displaced teeth will need to be monitored periodically for signs of infection that might affect the developing permanent teeth.

In the case of a knocked out permanent tooth, the best alternative is to replant the tooth immediately back into the socket – the less time the tooth is out of place, the better. Hold the tooth by the crown (the white part) and, if it is dirty, wash it briefly in cold water (close the drain in the sink!). Then, put the tooth into the socket and have your child hold it in place by biting on a piece of gauze. If you’re unable to replant the tooth, store it in cold milk on the way to the pediatric dentist. This will help give the tooth the best opportunity for reattachment.

If your child experiences any kind of dental emergency, remain as calm as possible to lessen his or her anxiety. Children take their emotional cues from the adults around them – so a calm demeanor is always helpful. The primary concern in these cases is to control the bleeding, which can be done with clean, wet gauze or a washcloth.

Act fast – and remember, your pediatric dentist is a phone call away!

Dental emergencies can be scary, but acting quickly can potentially save a tooth, prevent infection and reduce the need for extensive dental treatment down the road – so never hesitate to call Eversmiles if you don’t know what to do. Remember: a child with a healthy mouth will have an easier time eating, speaking, sleeping, playing, going to school, paying attention in class and all the other things that make growing up such a wonderful time.

Article originally posted by MouthMonsters.


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All parents know teething can be a stressful and trying time filled with sleepless nights. Here are five things parents need to know to navigate the teething landscape, straight from the source – the little tooth that can be a big pain for babies, parents and caregivers alike!

1. You can expect me to show up around the time your little one is 6 – 8 months old. But please have patience! Sometimes I need a little more time, and will arise around 12 – 14 months of age.

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2. You will know when I’m about to arrive because your little one might be irritable and attempting to chew on hard objects. I usually show up first in the bottom jaw with a buddy, then my friends, the two top teeth, show up next!

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3. The best way to help me introduce myself to your little one is to use a teething ring or gently rub your child’s gums with a cool, wet washcloth with a clean finger.

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4. Once I’ve arrived, it’s time to start brushing each morning and night and begin flossing once I’m touching another tooth. This will typically happen around or after age 2. You should supervise brushing until your little one is 7 or 8 years old. Most children will master flossing by age 10.

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5. After I appear, it’s time to visit the pediatric dentist! He’ll be able to tell you how to take care of my baby teeth friends and me once we all arrive. Part of keeping us healthy means being prepared for any emergencies – be sure to place this guide on your fridge with your pediatric dentist’s contact information in case I’m knocked out or chipped!

teething five


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Eversmiles Pediatric Dentistry would like to offer a #SmallThanks to all of your thoughtful reviews!

This video highlights some of your reviews through Google that mean a lot to us.

Your voice and your experiences matter to us. We strive for you to have the best dentist visit at our office, every time you visit!

We’ve received over 200 reviews (and counting), and we always seek out feedback from our patients. Please click here if you’d like to leave us a review!

 


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For healthy teeth, choose healthy, whole food snacks, like fruit vegetables, and cheese.  As your child gets older, raw or roasted nuts are also great options for a healthy smile.

If brushing is a struggle for your infant or toddler, four hands can be better than two.  Have one person place the child’s legs around their torso, while the child lies back into the partner’s lap for brushing teeth.   If a partner is unavailable to assist you, we recommend sitting on the floor, with your child’s head in your lap to achieve the best access.

For brushing the teeth of children less than 2 years old, use a rice grain amount of fluoride toothpaste; even though the child will likely swallow the paste, this is a safe and helpful dose of fluoride for your child.  For children over the age of 2, a small pea-sized amount of toothpaste is recommended.

Remember to keep toothpaste out of your child’s reach, and always have an adult dispense toothpaste for children less than eight years old.  

Although your child may seem independent at five years old, it is best to supervise brushing at least before bedtime until your child is 8 years old, to ensure that proper cleaning is taking place.

Introduce flossing as soon as you notice that child’s teeth are touching.  We recommend floss sticks as the simplest means of cleaning between young teeth.  If flossing is a struggle for your child, concentrate on cleaning between the molars in the back of the mouth.

Feel free to click here to print off this coloring page to promote healthy eating and dental habits!


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A few terms you might hear at the dentist:

 

Abscess: A pocket or sack of pus and gas produced by an infection

 

Caries: tooth decay, also known as a cavity

 

Endodontist: a dentist who specializes in root canals and treating disease and infection of tooth pulp

 

Gingiva: also called gums

 

Local anesthesia: numbs a specific part of the body to prevent pain during a procedure

 

Occlusion: the alignment of the teeth of the lower jaw with the corresponding teeth of the upper jaw when closed

 

Malocclusion: a defect in the normal position of the upper and lower teeth when the mouth is closed

 

Orthodontist: a dentist who specializes in the diagnosis, prevention and correction of malocclusion

 

Overbite: a type of malocclusion where the upper and lower teeth overlap when they close together

 

Overjet: a type of malocclusion where the upper front teeth angle horizontally outwards; also called horizontal overlap or “buck teeth”

 

Pedodontist: a dentist who specializes in the care and treatment of children’s teeth; also called pediatric dentist

 

General anesthesia: renders patient unconscious so they will not feel or remember a procedure

 

Primary teeth: a child’s temporary or “baby” teeth, which include four incisors, two canines, and four molars in each jaw

 

Permanent teeth: replacing a child’s primary teeth, this second set of teeth—32 in all—includes two canines and 10 premolars and molars in each jaw

 


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Preparing for Your First Visit?

Happy Smiles Start Here

There are many things you can do to help prepare your child for their first dental visit.   Reading books about going to the dentist is a great way to introduce your child dentistry.  Speak about the dental office using positive terms, and PLEASE DO NOT use words such as, “hurt,” “needle,” “shot,” “drill,” and “pain,” to refer to dental care.  We like to set a positive tone to encourage your child to have a successful visit.

The first visit is a chance for us to get to know your child and for your child to get to know us. A new environment and new people can be a lot for a child to take in. It’s important to make sure their first experience at Eversmiles is positive.
Let your child know that she/he is growing up, and part of becoming a “big kid” is making sure that their teeth are healthy with a visit to the dentist.

 

On the day of your child’s visit, we ask that one guardian come with your child so that we can focus on his or her needs, and thoroughly review your child’s oral care with you.  We ask that siblings without an appointment remain at home, or in the waiting area with a responsible adult. If your child is comfortable, she or he is welcome to come back to treatment area by themselves, and we can review our visit with you at the end of the appointment.

Depending on the age and tolerance of your child, the first visit will consist of an oral examination, cleaning, x-rays, and fluoride varnish.  If your child is an infant or toddler, or requires some extra hand-holding, the exam will likely take place in a private consultation room. Preschool-aged children through adolescents typically receive their exam and complete cleaning in our kid-friendly dental chairs.

If you were referred to our office specifically for dental treatment, your child’s first visit will be a consultation so that we may meet you and your child, assess the treatment required, and determine the best and safest means of providing dental care for your child.  Restorative treatment will NOT be completed at your child’s first dental visit with us.

We will discuss a treatment plan with you should your child need additional services, but we do not provide treatment on the first visit.

 

Before your child’s appointment, we will send you a patient registration and medical history form, which are also available on our downloadable forms. We ask that you arrive 15 minutes before the appointment to allow time to register and for your child to get comfortable.

If you have any questions about our services or policies, please don’t hesitate to contact us or take a look at our frequently asked questions.


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7 Easy Tips for Keeping your Baby Cavity-Free

Oral bacteria is passed from caregiver to infant. For this reason, avoid sharing food (pre-chewing), oral items, or rinsing dropped pacifiers in your own mouth, especially if you have dental restorations or a history of decay. Advise other caregivers that your child may encounter to do the same.

Keep your mouth healthy – chronic inflammation is linked to other systemic health risk factors, which can affect fetal health.

Chew sugar free gum, ideally xylitol based (e.g. Ice Breakers Ice Cubes, Spry)

Make it a goal to wean off night feedings prior to the eruption of your baby’s first tooth, should your child’s health permit it.

As your child grows, should you choose to offer juice, time the juice to coincide with a meal. Avoid offering juice if possible, especially between meals, and reserve it as a treat for special occasions.

Use infant bottles for water, breast milk or formula only. When traveling, we recommend bringing water, breast milk, or formula, as needed for your child’s age.

Fluoride toothpaste is recommended for all children, even those who cannot spit. Use a small amount (about the size of a grain of rice), smushed onto the toothbrush, and store toothpaste out of reach of children. Start off slowly, with nighttime brushing, and gradually build daily brushing into your child’s routine.

If your child has special dietary requirements (e.g. Pediasure, nasogastric tube) or medications (e.g. albuterol, vyvanse), we can help you manage oral health and talk about how best to deliver supplemental nutrition and medication to prevent decay.

Our goal is to instill healthy habits early on, to help every child remain cavity-free for life. Ultimately, if your child has decay, do not feel guilty. We are here to work with you as a member of your child’s healthcare team. Together, we can give your child a fresh start, and manage his or her disease going forward.

For more information about the role of pediatric dentists and ideas for better oral health, please visit “Mouth Monsters” where they have plenty of Parent Resources.


Eversmiles Pediatric Dentistry

Our mission is to give your child happy, healthy smiles that last a lifetime. We work in partnership with our patients, their families and the health care community to provide the best treatment, while creating positive dental experiences that will set the stage for long-term oral health.

 

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